Radiocarbon dating and evolution

Rated 4.98/5 based on 672 customer reviews

The Triceratops brow horn was excavated in May 2012 and stored at the Glendive Dinosaur and Fossil Museum.The Museum, which has since 2005 been in cooperation with the Paleochronology Group, a team of consultants in geology, paleontology, chemistry, engineering, and education, sent a sample of the outer portion of the Triceratops brow horn to Head of the Paleochronology Group Hugh Miller, at his request, in order to carry out Carbon-14 dating.Traditionally researchers built timelines of human prehistory based on fossils and artifacts, which can be directly dated with methods such as radiocarbon dating and Potassium-argon dating.However, these methods require ancient remains to have certain elements or preservation conditions, and that is not always the case.Moreover, relevant fossils or artifacts have not been discovered for all milestones in human evolution.Analyzing DNA from present-day and ancient genomes provides a complementary approach for dating evolutionary events.

Triceratops, a name meaning “three-horned face”, is a genus of herbivorous ceratopsid dinosaur that is said to have first appeared during the late Maastrichtian stage of the late Cretaceous period, about 68 million years ago in what is now North America, and became extinct in the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event 66 million years ago.Archaeological geology as a science had to precede the proposal of evolution, as an understanding of the immense age of the earth is necessary to understand evolution.Cuvier established amongst the scientific community the fact of extinction.Mr Miller sent the sample to the University of Georgia, Center for Applied Isotope Studies, for this purpose.The sample was divided at the lab into two fractions with the “bulk” or collagen break down products yielding an age of 33,570 ± 120 years and the carbonate fraction of bone bioapatite yielding an age of 41,010 ± 220 years [UGAMS-11752 & 11752a].

Leave a Reply